The Work Matters

A Guide for New Faculty Teaching at City Tech

References

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    Contact: Jason N. Adsit, Ph.D., Teaching & Learning Center SUNY-Buffalo, 212 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260; adsit@buffalo.edu
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Resource Links

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Dreyfuss, A.E., Jordan, J., Rajaram, K., Caka, M. (2014). (2nd Ed.). The work matters:
A guide for new faculty teaching at City Tech. New York City College of Technology, CUNY.
Online at http://facultycommons.citytech.cuny.edu/teachingguide.

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The Work Matters: A guide for new faculty teaching at City Tech. New York City College of Technology, CUNY by A.E. Dreyfuss is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.