CUNY’s 16th Annual IT Conference

Instructional/Information Technology in CUNY: Opening Access

The escalating costs of higher education—both tuition and the collateral expenses of textbooks and course materials—have widespread effects. With the announcement of the Excelsior Scholarship and new funding to develop Open Educational Resources, CUNY is poised to ease financial barriers to college for even more students than we already serve. And yet “access” to higher education is a complex issue that extends far beyond the mere costs of attendance to adequately meeting student needs. “Access” includes ADA compliance, access to course materials and devices used for digital materials, Internet access, access to campus spaces and services, access to faculty and community, and more. CUNY’s 16th Annual IT Conference will examine the complex and evolving relationship between technology and manifold issues of access to higher education.

As has been the case since its inception, the conference will be held at John Jay College, offering overviews of the University and colleges’ key IT initiatives, discussions of how technology can support and advance teaching, scholarship, and administration, and a chance to meet with vendors. As always, proposals for presentations are invited from the CUNY community, particularly on how we can foster access and success.

Proposals are invited for panels or presentations as well as roundtables, workshops, or other interactions. Each proposal should include a title, an abstract of no more than 200 words, and the name and affiliation of each participant. Proposals from individuals are welcome, but panel proposals from groups that can present varied perspectives on a subject are particularly welcome. The theme of “Opening Access,” includes:

1. What does “access” mean for CUNY, and what does it mean to make higher education accessible using technology? What barriers to access can technology mitigate? What barriers might technology create?

2. What technological and pedagogical challenges and opportunities do we face in expanding access to programs and learning materials? How do CUNY’s scale and mission affect our approach?

3. How can we enhance student experiences and outcomes by sharing materials and best practices across departments, programs, campuses, and between faculty and administration?

Proposals must be submitted using the form at cunyitconference.commons.gc.cuny.edu

Proposals are due September 15, 2017, at 5:00 pm. Acceptances will be announced by the end of that month.

CUNY’s 15th Annual IT Conference

Keynote Speaker

George Otte, University Director of Academic Technology, CUNY / Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, CUNY SPS

Public universities are in a longstanding bind that demands growth in programs and enrollments, high student achievement and efficient use of limited funding. As CUNY heeds the call to serve more students – especially via online, hybrid and flipped instruction – we have an opportunity to grow in ways that place student needs at the center of our digital work. The City University of New York’s 15th Annual IT Conference will examine the robust and innovative work that has made CUNY a leader in instructional technology, and consider ways we can share best practices for smart growth in any budget climate.

CUNY’s 14th Annual IT Conference

Instructional/Information Technology in CUNY: Innovating and Integrating

Innovation and integration are essential, nowhere more so than with academic uses of technology, but they pull in different directions: innovation strikes out in new directions; integration pulls in and consolidates. Without integrating the new, we would have only random acts of innovation; without innovation, integration would stultify rather than advance. The City University of New York’s 14th Annual IT Conference will look at how our innovations can become more visible and sustainable as well as how integration can help us all move forward. What innovations are taking place in our core enterprises of teaching, learning, and research that we need to be more aware of and connected to? How has our functioning as a university system become more systemic and efficient? How do we avoid reinventing whatever new “wheel” emerges while making sure that we keep being inventive?

As has been the case since its inception, the conference will be held at John Jay College, offering overviews of the University’s key IT initiatives, discussions of how technology can support and advance teaching, scholarship, and administration, and a chance to meet with vendors. As always, proposals for presentations are invited from the CUNY community, particularly on how innovations can be shared and sustained.

1. What are important innovations are emerging? How do we know that what’s new is not just different but better by careful assessment and evaluation?

2. How are we moving away from “random acts of innovation” and toward ways of consolidating and disseminating effective change? What are we doing to make innovations more visible, more accessible, more supportable?

3. How can alternatives to consolidation like collaboration and cooperation foster flexibility as well as integration, freedom as well as efficiency?

Proposals are invited for panels or presentations but also roundtables, workshops, and other interactions. Specifying format as well as focus, each proposal should include a title, an abstract of no more than 200 words, and the name and affiliation of each party to the proposal. (Proposals are welcome from individuals but are particularly welcome from groups that have found ways of arranging multiple perspectives on a subject.)

Proposals must be submitted using this form by 9/16/15. Acceptances will be announced by the end of that month.


[icon name=”calendar” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Date: Friday, December 4, 2015
[icon name=”clock-o” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Time: 9 AM – 5 PM

[icon name=”map-marker” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Venue: John Jay College of Criminal Justice

For more information visit: cunyitconference.commons.gc.cuny.edu

CUNY’s 14th Annual IT Conference

Instructional/Information Technology in CUNY: Innovating and Integrating

Innovation and integration are essential, nowhere more so than with academic uses of technology, but they pull in different directions: innovation strikes out in new directions; integration pulls in and consolidates. Without integrating the new, we would have only random acts of innovation; without innovation, integration would stultify rather than advance. The City University of New York’s 14th Annual IT Conference will look at how our innovations can become more visible and sustainable as well as how integration can help us all move forward. What innovations are taking place in our core enterprises of teaching, learning, and research that we need to be more aware of and connected to? How has our functioning as a university system become more systemic and efficient? How do we avoid reinventing whatever new “wheel” emerges while making sure that we keep being inventive?

As has been the case since its inception, the conference will be held at John Jay College, offering overviews of the University’s key IT initiatives, discussions of how technology can support and advance teaching, scholarship, and administration, and a chance to meet with vendors. As always, proposals for presentations are invited from the CUNY community, particularly on how innovations can be shared and sustained.

1. What are important innovations are emerging? How do we know that what’s new is not just different but better by careful assessment and evaluation?

2. How are we moving away from “random acts of innovation” and toward ways of consolidating and disseminating effective change? What are we doing to make innovations more visible, more accessible, more supportable?

3. How can alternatives to consolidation like collaboration and cooperation foster flexibility as well as integration, freedom as well as efficiency?

Proposals are invited for panels or presentations but also roundtables, workshops, and other interactions. Specifying format as well as focus, each proposal should include a title, an abstract of no more than 200 words, and the name and affiliation of each party to the proposal. (Proposals are welcome from individuals but are particularly welcome from groups that have found ways of arranging multiple perspectives on a subject.)

Proposals must be submitted using this form by 9/16/15. Acceptances will be announced by the end of that month.


[icon name=”calendar” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Date: Thursday, December 3, 2015 / Friday, December 4, 2015
[icon name=”clock-o” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Time: 9 AM – 5 PM

[icon name=”map-marker” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Venue: John Jay College of Criminal Justice

For more information visit: cunyitconference.commons.gc.cuny.edu

CUNY’s 13th Annual IT Conference

Change is the new constant, but some (big) changes are more like shifts: shifts in practice and perspective; generational shifts; shifts in procedure and position; even tectonic shifts. The City University of New York’s 13th annual IT Conference will sum up some shifts our many changes add up to. What shifts are taking place in the core enterprises of teaching, learning, and research? In what ways has our functioning as a university system changed? Which changes portend more change, or more effective ways of effecting it?

As has been the case since its inception, the conference will be held at John Jay College, offering overviews of the University’s key IT initiatives, discussions of how technology continues to affect teaching, scholarship, and administration, and a chance to meet with vendors. As always, proposals for presentations are invited from the CUNY community, particularly about how tech-mediated changes can lead to important shifts in practice.

1. What changes seem to be game-changers, shifts in the way we do things that pose new possibilities? What changes seem to be worth shifting to, scaling up, spreading out?

2. How are we moving away from “random acts of innovation” and toward ways of consolidating and disseminating effective change through collaboration? What are we doing to make effective change more visible, more accessible, more supportable?

3. Because change is not synonymous with progress, what are we doing to make sure that the changes we put into effect result in real gains? How are we assessing shifts in practices and procedures to ensure that we have better outcomes, not just different procedures?

Proposals are invited for panels or presentations but also roundtables, workshops, and other interactions. Specifying format as well as focus, each proposal should include a title, an abstract of no more than 200 words, and the name and affiliation of each party to the proposal. (Proposals are welcome from individuals but are particularly welcome from groups that have found ways of arranging multiple perspectives on a subject.)

Submit a proposal by 9/15/14. Acceptances will be announced by the end of that month.

[icon name=”file-pdf-o” class=””] Click to view poster.