Extrapolation, Interdisciplinarity, and Learning: The Second Annual City Tech Symposium on Science Fiction

Science Fiction Symposium 2

View the program: https://openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/sciencefictionatcitytech/.

 

Knowledge is indivisible. When people grow wise in one direction, they are sure to make it easier for themselves to grow wise in other directions as well. On the other hand, when they split up knowledge, concentrate on their own field, and scorn and ignore other fields, they grow less wise—even in their own field.

How often people speak of art and science as though they were two entirely different things, with no interconnection. . . . That is all wrong. . . . If we go through the history of human advance, we find that there are many places where art and science intermingled and where an advance in one was impossible without an advance in the other.

–Isaac Asimov, A Roving Mind (1983)

Over twenty years after C. P. Snow published The Two Cultures, the unparalleled writer, scientist, and educator Isaac Asimov defends the “interconnection” between the sciences and the arts. In fact, he demonstrates the importance of interdisciplinarity—both within STEM fields as well as between STEM and the humanities—through his unsurpassed 500+ books ranging from Biblical scholarship to biochemistry, and science to science fiction. He shows how disciplines inform and strengthen one another to create greater knowledge and wisdom, which in turn leads to greater understanding and new insights. While significant strides have been made in promoting interdisciplinarity, Asimov’s defense continues to echo today.

Join us for a one-day symposium in the spirit of Asimov’s defense by exploring interdisciplinarity through the lens of science fiction—a mediating ‘third culture’ (borrowing Snow’s term) that combines the sciences and the humanities to extrapolate new worlds while reflecting on our own. This symposium aims to explore science fiction as an interdisciplinary literary form, a tool for teaching interdisciplinarity, and a cultural art form benefiting from interdisciplinary research approaches.

Hosted by the School of Arts and Sciences at the New York City College of Technology, CUNY.

The annual Symposium on Science Fiction is held in celebration of the City Tech Science Fiction Collection, an archival holding of over 600-linear feet of magazines, anthologies, novels, and scholarship. It is located in the Archives and Special Collections of the Ursula C. Schwerin Library (Atrium Building, A543C, New York City College of Technology, 300 Jay Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201). More information about the collection and how to access it is available here: https://openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/sciencefictionatcitytech/librarycollection/.

2017 Bronx CUNY EdTech Showcase

“Active Learning & Student-Centered Pedagogies”

Join us for a very special opportunity to gather together and explore some of the most effective and engaging classroom practices. Innovators from the three Bronx CUNY colleges, Lehman College, Hostos and Bronx Community Colleges, demonstrate their exemplary models for integrating and infusing technology into their hybrid, fully online and traditional teaching methods. This year’s EdTech Showcase will take place at Bronx Community College and will focus on active learning and student-centered pedagogies.

Click here to RSVP

For additional information, please visit our homepage: CUNY.is/bronxedtech

Questions?

If you have questions, do contact your corresponding college’s member from the Organizing Committee Chairs:

Mark Lennerton at Bronx: mark.lennerton@bcc.cuny.edu

Albert Robinson at Bronx: albert.robinson@bcc.cuny.edu

Stephen Castellano at Lehman: stephen.castellano@lehman.cuny.edu

Carlos Guevara at Hostos: cguevara@hostos.cuny.edu

Kate Lyons at Hostos: clyons@hostos.cuny.edu

Symposium on Amazing Stories: Inspiration, Learning, and Adventure in Science Fiction

Symposium on Amazing Stories

View Program

“By ‘scientifiction’ I mean the Jules Verne, H. G. Wells and Edgar Allan Poe type
of story—a charming romance intermingled with scientific fact and prophetic
vision … Not only do these amazing tales make tremendously interesting
reading—they are always instructive.”
-Hugo Gernsback, 1926.

When the widely recognized “Father of Science Fiction,” Hugo Gernsback first coined the term that captured the essence of the genre we now call science fiction (SF), he envisioned SF as a new form of literature that inspired with prophecy, taught with scientific and technical facts, and engaged with adventure. These traits unique to SF have launched many of its readers on trajectories into the STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) fields.

Join us for a one-day symposium exploring SF as a medium for engaging imagination, a means for exploring STEM/STEAM fields, and an instrument for discovering interdisciplinary connections, and also celebrating the new City Tech Science Fiction Collection held in the Archives and Special Collections of the Ursula C. Schwerin Library.

Contact Jason Ellis at JEllis@citytech.cuny.edu for more information.

Organizing Committee: Jason Ellis (Chair), Aaron Barlow, Jill Belli, and Mary Nilles.

Hosted by the School of Arts and Sciences at the New York City College of Technology, CUNY.