CST Colloquium: Energy Management as a Service (EMaaS): Design, Analysis, and Realization

Speaker:
Yu-Wen Chen, Ph.D., CST

Abstract:
Dr. Chen presents an introduction to smart grid and cloud computing as the foundation for the design of customer-oriented energy-efficient systems (EmaaS). These systems provide financial incentives to customers thus enhancing the renewable energy sources(solar, wind, electrical) integration with the smart grid community.

CST Colloquium: Ontology-based Classification and Faceted Search Interface for APIs

[icon name=”calendar” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Date: April 7th, 2016 at 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
[icon name=”map-marker” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Location: Namm 928
Speaker: Knarig Arabshian

FC_Clients_CSTColloquium_ARABSHIAN_04_07_16_FinalAbstract: This work introduces faceted service discovery. It uses the Programmable Web directory as its corpus of APIs and enhances the search to enable faceted search, given an OWL ontology. The ontology describes semantic features of the APIs. We have designed the API classification ontology using LexOnt, a software we have built for semi-automatic ontology creation tool. LexOnt is geared toward non-experts within a service domain who want to create a high-level ontology that describes the domain. Using well- known NLP algorithms, LexOnt generates a list of top terms and phrases from the Programmable Web corpus to enable users to find high-level features that distinguish one Programmable Web service category from another. To also aid non-experts, LexOnt relies on outside sources such as Wikipedia and Wordnet to help the user identify the important terms within a service category. Using the ontology created from LexOnt, we have created APIBrowse, a faceted search interface for APIs. The ontology, in combination with the use of the Apache Solr search platform, is used to generate a faceted search interface for APIs based on their distinguishing features. With this ontology, an API is classified and displayed underneath multiple categories and displayed within the APIBrowse interface. APIBrowse gives programmers the ability to search for APIs based on their semantic features and keywords and presents them with a filtered and more accurate set of search results.

Knarig Arabshian is an Assistant Professor in the Computer Science Department at Hofstra University, since Fall 2014. Prior to that she was a Member of Technical Staff at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ. She received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from Columbia University in 2008.

Professor Arabshian’s interests lie in the field of semantic web, service discovery and composition, context-aware computing and distributed systems. The goal of her research is to drive forward the idea of a personalized web. Her work explores ways of describing data meaningfully and designing frameworks and systems for efficient data discovery. During her tenure at Bell Labs, she worked on different aspects of ontology creation, distribution and querying.

For additional information, please go to openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/cstcolloquium/

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CST Colloquium: NYC, Media and Technology: What’s Hot

[icon name=”calendar” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Date: March 24th, 2016 at 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
[icon name=”map-marker” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Location: Namm 928
Speaker: Justin Hendrix

FC_Clients_CSTColloquium_Hendrix_03_24_16_FinalAbstract: Founded in 2010, NYC Media Lab is dedicated to driving innovation and ultimately job growth in media and technology by facilitating collaboration between the City’s universities and its companies. Comprised of a consortium including New York City Economic Development Corporation, New York University, Columbia University, The New School, CUNY, and Pratt Institute, NYC Media Lab’s goals include generating research and development, knowledge transfer, and talent development across all of the City’s campuses. Justin will describe NYC Media Lab, its projects, and the curiosities of its member companies.

Justin Hendrix connects companies seeking to advance digital media technologies with university capabilities in order to drive collaborative innovation. Before joining NYC Media Lab, Hendrix was Vice President, Business Development & Innovation for The Economist Group in the Americas, where he directed the Group’s innovation process, including prototyping, testing, and commercializing new digital media business concepts. Prior to this role, Hendrix directed brand marketing and communications and ran The Economist’s thought leadership events business in the Americas. He is a regular writer and speaker on media & innovation. Hendrix holds a Bachelor of Arts from the College of William & Mary and a Master of Science in Technology Commercialization from the McCombs School of Business, University of Texas at Austin. He lives in Brooklyn.

For additional information, please go to openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/cstcolloquium/

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CST Colloquium: Bio-inspired Computation Approach for Tumor Growth with Spatial Randomness Analysis of Kidney Cancer Xenograft Pathology Slides

[icon name=”calendar” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Date: March 10th, 2016 at 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
[icon name=”map-marker” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Location: Namm 928
Speaker: Aydin Saribudak

FC_Clients_CSTColloquium_SARIBUDAK_03_10_16_FinalAbstract:  In our research, we analyze digitized images of Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E) slides equipped with tumorous tissues from patient derived xenograft models to build our bio-inspired computation method, namely Personalized Relevance Parameterization of Spatial Randomness (PReP-SR). Applying spatial pattern analysis techniques of quadrat counts, kernel estimation and nearest neighbor functions to the images of the H&E samples, slide-specific features are extracted to examine the hypothesis that existence of dependency of nuclei positions possesses information of individual tumor characteristics. These features are then used as inputs to PReP-SR to compute tumor growth parameters for exponential-linear model. Differential evolution algorithms are developed for tumor growth parameter computations, where a candidate vector in a population consists of size selection indices for spatial evaluation and weight coefficients for spatial features and their correlations. Using leave-one-out-cross-validation method, we showed that, for a set of H&E slides from kidney cancer patient derived xenograft models, PReP-SR generates personalized model parameters with an average error rate of 13:58%. The promising results indicate that bio-inspired computation techniques may be useful to construct mathematical models with patient specific growth parameters in clinical systems.

Aydin Saribudak received his Bachelor of Science degree, in 2005, from Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department of Middle East Technical University (METU), Turkey. After his graduation, he worked as software developer and researcher in telecommunication field for more than 5 years. Aydin is currently a Ph.D. candidate at the City College of the CUNY. His interests include biologically inspired computation algorithms, artificial intelligence, and their applications to personalized mathematical models for tumor growth and anti-cancer therapy.

For additional information, please go to openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/cstcolloquium/

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CST Colloquium: Alberto Pepe presents Data-driven, Interactive Scientific Articles in a Collaborative Environment with Authorea

[icon name=”calendar” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Date: February 11th, 2016 at 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
[icon name=”map-marker” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Location: Namm 928

FC_Clients_CSTColloquium_Pepe_02_11_16_Final

Abstract: Most tools that scientists use for the preparation of scholarly manuscripts, such as Microsoft Word and LaTeX, function offline and do not account for the born-digital nature of research objects. Also, most authoring tools in use today are not designed for collaboration, and, as scientific collaborations grow in size, research transparency and the attribution of scholarly credit are at stake. In this talk, I will show how the Authorea platform allows scientists to collaboratively write rich data-driven manuscripts on the web–articles that would natively offer readers a dynamic, interactive experience with an article’s full text, images, data, and code–paving the road to increased data sharing, data reuse, research reproducibility, and Open Science.

Alberto Pepe is the co-founder of Authorea. He recently finished a Postdoctorate in Astrophysics at Harvard University. During his postdoctorate, Alberto was also a fellow of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society and the Institute for Quantitative Social Science. Alberto is the author of 30 publications in the fields of Information Science, Data Science, Computational Social Science, and Astrophysics. He obtained his Ph.D. in Information Science from the University of California, Los Angeles with a dissertation on scientific collaboration networks which was awarded with the Best Dissertation Award by the American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T). Prior to starting his Ph.D., Alberto worked in the Information Technology Department of CERN, in Geneva, Switzerland, where he worked on data repository software and also promoted Open Access among particle physicists. Alberto holds a M.Sc. in Computer Science and a B.Sc. in Astrophysics, both from University College London, U.K. Alberto was born and raised in the wine-making town of Manduria, in Puglia, Southern Italy.

For additional information, please go to openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/cstcolloquium/

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CST Colloquium: The Modern, Responsive Web Site

[icon name=”calendar” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Date: November 5th, 2015 at 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
[icon name=”map-marker” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Location: Namm 923
Speaker: Anthony Holley

Abstract: Department of Computer Systems Technology, New York City College of Technology, City University of New York
More and more use is being made of cell phones for web exploration at the expense of conventional desk and laptop PCs. The modern web has to accommodate all these many screen sizes from High definition PC screens through iPads to miniature cell phone and maybe even smaller? This presentation will give many outward examples of valid of web sites and discuss internal coding techniques.

Anthony is a Lecturer at the Computer Systems Technology Department of New York City College of Technology, City University of New York. He holds a BSc from King’s College London and an MBA from Regent Street Polytechnic, London, UK.

For additional information, please go to openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/cstcolloquium/

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CST Colloquium: Pharmacology Powered by Computational Analysis: Predicting Cardiotoxicity of Chemotherapeutics

[icon name=”calendar” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Date: October 22nd, 2015 at 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
[icon name=”map-marker” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Location: Namm 923
Speaker: Jaehee Shim

Abstract: Cardiotoxicity is unfortunately a common side effect of many modern chemotherapeutic agents. The mechanisms that underlie these detrimental effects on heart muscle, however, remain unclear. The Drug Toxicity Signature Generation Center at ISMMS aims to address this unresolved issue by providing a bridge between molecular changes in cells and the prediction of pathophysiological effects. I will discuss ongoing work in which we use next-generation sequencing to quantify changes in gene expression that occur in cardiac myocytes after they are treated with potentially toxic chemotherapeutic agents. I will focus in particular on the computational pipeline we are developing that integrates sophisticated sequence alignment, statistical and network analysis, and dynamical mathematical models to develop novel predictions about the mechanisms underlying drug-induced cardiotoxicity.

Jaehee Shim is a Ph.D candidate in the Biophysics and Systems Pharmacology Program at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS). As a part of her Ph.D. studies, she is building dynamical prediction models based on analysis of gene expression data generated by the Drug Toxicity Signature Generation Center at ISMMS. She received her B.S in Biochemistry from the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Prior to starting her Ph.D, Jaehee worked at the ISMMS Genomics Core with a team of senior scientists and gained experience in improving and troubleshooting RNA sequencing protocols using Next Generation Sequencing Platforms.

For additional information, please go to openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/cstcolloquium/

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Upcoming seminars

CST Colloquium: How We Use Functional Programming to Find the Bad Guys

[icon name=”calendar” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Date: October 1st, 2015

[icon name=”clock-o” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
[icon name=”map-marker” class=”” unprefixed_class=””] Location: Namm 923
Speaker: Rick Minerich

Abstract: Bayard Rock, LLC, is a private research and software development company with headquarters in the Empire State Building. It is a leader in the filed in the research and development of tools for improving the state of the art in anti-money laundering and fraud detection. As you might imagine, these tools rely heavily on mathematics and graph algorithms. In this talk, Richard Minerich will discuss the research activities of Bayard Rock and its approaches to build tools to find the “bad guys”. Richard Minerich is Bayard Rock’s Director of Research and Development. Rick has expertise in F#, C#, C, C++, C++/CLI,. NET (1.1, 2.0, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, and 4.5), Object Oriented Design, Functional Design, Entity Resolution, Machine Learning, Concurrency, and Image Processing. He is interested in working on algorithmically, mathematically complex projects and remains open to explore new ideas.

Rick holds 2 patents. The first one, co-invented with a colleague, is titled “Method of Image Analysis Using Sparse Hough Transform.” The other independently held is known as “Method for Document to Template Alignment.”

For additional information, please go to openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/cstcolloquium/

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Upcoming seminars

CST Colloquium: Static Analysis and Verification of C Programs

Date: September 17th, 2015 at 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Location: Namm 923
Speaker: Subash Shankar

Abstract: Department of Computer Science, Hunter College, City University of New York
Recent years have seen the emergence of several static analysis techniques for reasoning about programs. This talk presents several major classes of techniques and tools that implement these techniques. Part of the presentation will be a demonstration of the tools.

Dr. Subash Shankar is an Associate Professor in the Computer Science department at Hunter College, CUNY. Prior to joining CUNY, he received a PhD from the University of Minnesota and was a postdoctoral fellow in the model checking group at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Shankar also has over 10 years of industrial experience, mostly in the areas of formal methods and tools for analyzing hardware and software systems.

For additional information, please go to openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/cstcolloquium/

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Other seminars